Anxiety

Many of us deal with stress and frustration multiple times each day. From delays on the subway to friendship or family drama, these events can interfere with your mood and create more emotional dysregulation if they are pushed away or ignored. During these times, the IMPROVE skill, developed by Marsha Linehan, can be used to reduce the intensity of their emotions in any kind of situation and feel more in control of their lives.
Research published in the journal Psychological Medicine found that the onset of a new mental disorder may be a consequence of exclusion from school. Excluded children can develop a range of mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety as well as behavioral problems. There can be a long-term impact on education and progress by excluding a child from school. This study suggests that their mental health may also deteriorate.
As a flight attendant for the last 22 years, it may surprise you to hear that I have a fear of roller coasters. I understand the anxiety that exists and how it controls my mind when I go to an amusement park. Going to an amusement park, though, is a choice. For many, avoiding flying whether for work, play, or fun, is not always an option. People who feel anxious about getting on a plane can experience  a sense of dread, panic and, at worst, paralyzing fear.
Do you know how to reduce social anxiety? Many of those who suffer from feeling insecure, shy or anxious anticipate the worst outcomes when it comes to engaging with others (even peers that they know). What many people don't recognize is that having some anxiety is healthy, we just don’t always know how to handle it. If you learn about how your body responds to fear, you can implement skills to feel more confident.
No matter who you are, practicing self-care is important for your mental and physical health. It can be hard to shift the focus from family and friends to yourself, and it's necessary. In fact, if you want to be the best for everyone else, you've got to spend some time on yourself first. Self-care doesn't mean avoiding your work to go to the spa or a fancy dinner; it's more about adding in activities each day that help you feel good.
Recently, I embarked on a series of conversations with people about their reasons for taking walks. I heard about a wide range of motivations. But surely one of the most compelling was walking as a way of coping with pain.
The way we speak to ourselves impacts every aspect of our lives. If we are critical and hard on ourselves, we become more stressed, depressed and insecure. Practicing self-compassion can help you become more motivated, self-assured and confident. Self-compassion research reveals that individuals who practice the core components are far less likely to suffer from mental health conditions and are more resilient.
For most of us, smartphones have become extensions of our hands. We rely on them for so much: to connect us to friends and family, to check the time, to manage our busy schedules, and if you’re in DBT therapy, to call your therapist for skills coaching. Our phones can be assets to our day, and they can also be distractions, leading us down a path of time-wasting and mindlessness. They can be reminders of all the stress in our lives, all the to-dos, and can be vehicles of jealousy and “FOMO” when on social media.

Mindfulness, a moment-by-moment awareness of one's thoughts, feelings and sensations, has gained worldwide popularity as a way to promote health and well-being. But what if someone isn't naturally mindful? Can they become so simply by trying to make mindfulness a "state of mind"? Or perhaps through a more focused, deliberate effort like meditation or mindfulness skills?

Did you know that most people don’t breathe properly? To do it properly, you must be conscious and mindful. When done correctly, breathing can relieve stress, anxiety, depression, pain, help you focus and concentrate, regulate sleep and wake cycles, and calm your central nervous system.
In light of the contentious 2016 Presidential election, no matter which candidate you voted for, many people are feeling burnt out, sad, defeated and depressed. There is an apparent rift in our country, which trickles down to challenges in our own circles of friends and family. Social media is swarming with articles and arguments. People are being de-friended on the Internet and in real life. Some teenagers are being bullied across the country for their political beliefs. Many people are feeling unsafe. Some people are feeling happy.